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You may notice that in most remarketing campaigns we will omit a portion of your audience. Peruse through this article to find out why!

Setting up a remarketing campaign in Google (or “retargeting” as it’s known in Facebook) is a powerful and effective way to capture conversions from people who did not initially convert.

Cookies and Tags

Before we dive into what remarketing is, we first need to understand what a “tag” is. Whenever someone completes a desired action on your website, a cookie gets installed in their browser. A “tag” is recorded and this information is collected by Google Tag Manager and sent over to Google Analytics for us to track.

For instance, a cookie can be fired and recorded as a tag whenever someone simply visits any page on your website, if they fill out a particular form, if they click on a link, if they make a purchase, etc.

In order to configure tagging, you need to set up an account with Google Tag Manager then have the tag installed on your website or desired web pages. Don’t worry though, if you’re a client of Solutions 8 we do that all for you!

So now that you know what a tag is, let’s talk about remarketing.

The Purpose of Remarketing

The overall goal of marketing and sales is to show the right offer, to the right person, at the right time.

If a person doesn’t initially complete an action (i.e. fill out a form, make a purchase), they’re not a lost cause. Why? Because they’ve been tagged.

We know that they didn’t take the desired action, and now they are anonymously put into a list of people who also didn’t take the desired action.

The goal then is to re-market to these people with different advertisements at different times, in an effort to get them to convert into the desired action. The more “touches” a prospective customer has with your business, the higher the likelihood of them converting into a customer.

Why Do We Exclude Some People In Remarketing Campaigns?

If someone has already completed the desired action, we don’t want to keep making them that same offer.

For instance, if you own a shoe store and are promoting the new Brooks Adrenaline GTS for men, you don’t want to keep showing this advertisement to the people who have already bought this item.

It’s a waste of ad spend and can annoy your customers. It is much wiser to change the ads that are shown to these people.

“They’re already customers. Aren’t they prime prospects to advertise to?”

They are! In fact, studies have shown that once someone becomes a customer they are far more likely to buy again when compared to someone who has never bought before.

However, to reiterate our earlier point, advertising the same products that these people have already bought isn’t an effective way to spend your advertising budget. They already know your product exists, what about showing them another product of yours that you think could help them too? Now you’re thinking!